Boomer Backlash
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By etrigan - Last updated: Tuesday, March 30, 2004 - Save & Share - 8 Comments

“Christian”:http://members.cox.net/cmmcalonan/ turned me on to “boomer deathwatch”:http://www.rickmcginnis.com/boomer/ which is apparently a site dedicated to bashing the baby boom. Typical rants go like “It’s no surprise that a generation raised to value youth more than experience, to obsess over their adolescent traumas and fetishize rebellion, even in its most commodified form, should try to re-engineer the school system to coddle, not challenge, their kids.”

Warms my heart, it does. The next is better:

Boomers are generally considered to have had their major effect in the cultural realm. Certainly, their effect on music has been profound: Rock and Roll would have begun with Elvis and ended with skiffle if not for millions of eager rebels and their allowances. They wrecked jazz, turned the blues into a museum artifact, and wrenched folk music from the backwoods onto the campus and hopeless irrelevance.

That job done, they’ve moved on to politics, which is as we speak being recast by the Democratic party as a way to project self-satisfied virtue and a narrow vision of guilty “tolerance” onto the world. They managed to make sex omnipresent and oppressive, family an implicit realm of psychodrama, and added a cheerily hopeless new genre to literature: self-help.

That said, Hendrix does rock.

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8 Responses to “Boomer Backlash”

Comment from KMc
Time March 30, 2004 at 10:53 am

Maybe the Baby Boom was all a collective dream and now we can get back to persecuting communists again like in the good old days.

Comment from Jank
Time March 30, 2004 at 11:54 am

> can get back to persecuting communists again like in the good old days

Ah, if only.

‘Cept wait – didn’t we win that one already?

Comment from KMc
Time March 30, 2004 at 1:05 pm

You know those wily Reds. They’re probably biding their time, waiting for their chance to strike back at the champions of freedom.

Comment from Jank
Time March 30, 2004 at 1:15 pm

> waiting for their chance to strike back at the champions of freedom.

It’s not the “champions of freedom” for whom I fear. It’s the folks who lived (and died) under the Reds.

Comment from Jank
Time March 30, 2004 at 1:50 pm

‘Though we’re building a freedom curtain (to coin a phrase) this time.

Comment from KMc
Time March 30, 2004 at 4:52 pm

Something I’ve been wondering … Is neocon anti-communist sentiment as much about fear of successful socialist programs as it is about liberating people from oppressive regimes?

If there were large countries getting along fine under socialism, might folks at home start thinking “well we should at least be able to provide universal health care and pensions here”?

Comment from jank
Time March 30, 2004 at 8:05 pm

> If there were large countries getting along fine under socialism, might folks at home start thinking

Yes, because there would be evidence that the system, as operated by real human beings, instead of as a thought exercise, conducted by half drunk/stoned academics, worked. Instead (to belabor a point), there are millions dead in eastern Europe, millions dead in China, millions dead in Cambodia, and hundreds of thousands who fled Cuba, Vietnam, etc, so on, and so forth.

But still people say “These are exceptions – the system still has merit.”

Check out the conservative track record:

1. Less comprehensive social nets push people into the job market instead of letting them free-load off of government. Exhibit A Compare the unemployment rate in the US and even the UK to the rates in Western Europe – The US wins, hands down. Exhibit B The “Contract with America” – comprehensive welfare reform passed to the consternation of liberals in the Congress, and within 24 months, the US experiences the lowest unemployment in about half a century. Yes, the booming economy had something to do with it, but even now, after over 2 million lost jobs, a recession, and the first attack on American soil since Pearl Harbor (and the first foreign attack on mainland America since the war of 1812) the unemployment rate is where it was in 1996 when WJC ran for re-election with record employment as a platform plank.

2. Socialized medicine blows goats for everyone, except the rich (as opposed to a US Market system, which only blows goats for the poor, who can get covered at emergency rooms as required by law) Exhibit ACanada may be free (to the end user’s immediate pocket) but it really blows: “”If the costs of hospitals and physicians are to be controlled, there will be continuing complaints about longer hospital waiting lists and the absence of the latest technology. There is increasing evidence that Canada should accept these problems,” wrote Jane Fulton in her 1993 book Canada’s Health Care System.
Exhibit BFree drugs? An entire continent of Limbaughs.

Should I continue? We can cover gun control leading to criminalization of self defense … eh – I belabor the point.

Comment from KMc
Time March 31, 2004 at 7:52 am

All I’m saying is that sometime around 1991, I seem to remember the world pretty much getting over the communism thing and the fear of it. I think we’re all pretty much agreed that it don’t work.

This is why it surprised me when I started hearing people talk about fighting communism again in the last few years. Why are people still so worried about it?

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